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Welcome...

Rupert Read, teacher, author, blogger and Green campaigner.Hi, I’m Rupert, and this, my site, gives you a way in to the things that I, probably like you, care about.

I’m a teacher (of philosophy), an author, a blogger, and – closest to my heart – a Green campaigner.

I believe strongly that Britain needs a positive change. We need a government that will put your health, your livelihood and your family before the interests of big business and endless ‘growth’.

We need action, and soon, against the values of greed and negativity that have lead to us facing potentially catastrophic climate change.

Instead, we need to value the good things about humanity; our ability to share, to care, to have fun, to communicate and to think intelligently and creatively about our own futures.

And we need a new way of thinking, about politics, about philosophy, and about our role in the world.

I hope you find something here of what you’re looking for. You can also visit my blog or follow me on Twitter.

And why not also check out my think-tank, Green House.

Yours,
Rupert Read, teacher, author, blogger and Green campaigner.

Latest writings

Economist-kings?

Spring 2007: the high-water mark of self-confidence for economic neo-liberalism. In March, both Henry Paulson and Ben Bernanke publicly stated that they saw no danger of recession, and that the subprime fiasco had been ‘contained’. As late as mid-May, with the sub-prime crisis in full throe, still Bernanke felt able to say this: Importantly, we see no serious broader spillover to banks or thrift institutions from the problems in the subprime market. In July, Paulson claimed: This is far and away the strongest global economy I’ve seen in my business lifetime; and on August 1st, I see the underlying economy as being very healthy. Neo-liberalism remained a movement triumphal around the world. No bunch of poverty-stricken mortgage-defaulters – who could conveniently be blamed for the little local difficulty – were going to derail this ideology.

The real reason why libertarians become climate-deniers

We live at a point in history at which the demand for individual freedom has never been stronger — or more potentially dangerous. For this demand — the product of good things, such as the refusal to submit to arbitrary tyranny characteristic of ‘the Enlightenment’, and of bad things, such as the rise of consumerism at the expense of solidarity and sociability — threatens to make it impossible to organise a sane, collective democratic response to the immense challenges now facing us as peoples and as a species. ”How dare you interfere with my ‘right’ to burn coal / to drive / to fly; how dare you interfere with my business’s ‘right’ to pollute?” The form of such sentiments would have seemed plain bizarre, almost everywhere in the world, until a few centuries ago; and to uncaptive minds (and un-neo-liberalised societies) still does. But it is a sentiment that can seem close to ‘common sense’ in more and more of the world: even though it threatens to cut off at the knees action to prevent existential threats to our collective survival, let alone our flourishing.